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Re: Retracing History of Kuching
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I found the following link from the Australian War memorial about Australian Force in Kuching and you might find more information.

link

Sarawak was liberated by BRIGADIER (BRIG) T. C. EASTIC from the Australian Force on board HMAS Kapunda. Kapunda is a Town at Barossa Valley, South Australia wine country. Next time, if I go to Barossa Valley, I will stop by Kapunda as there is a piece of Sarawak history there.

Posted on: 2007/6/12 13:21
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Re: Retracing History of Kuching
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Nice find. Now this is learning history.

Posted on: 2007/6/12 13:25
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Re: Retracing History of Kuching
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Isn't there a small Australian War Memorial/Cemetery in St Joseph's Cathedral grounds? It's the big white cross with the small shed.Right next to the Sarawak Club tennis courts? I remember the time when I accidentally hit the tennis ball too high and it landed near the cemetery. I lost one but found 4...need tennis balls, go to that area!!

Remember, our Sejarah books were written by those in West Malaysia. The Brookes ruled the country wisely, the Australians and British Armies liberated Sarawak, Sarawak's Parliament/State Assembly is the oldest in Southeast Asia.

My uncle, who served in the Australian armed forces, was very sad when there wasn't a proper mention of his contingent liberating Kuching. In Sydney, Perth, and Auckland, you see engravings on War Memorials with either Borneo or Sarawak written on it. In Kuching, the only proper War Memorial for them is in Batu Lintang, which I didn't even know about until 2 years back.

You learn more when you go read books written by overseas academics, out Sejarah books are West-Malaysian centric, sadly. In an effort to help solidify national integration, anything contrary to the destructive image of colonial rule is erased or downplayed.

I learnt more about the Brooke Dynasty in an afternoon at the NSW library than 5 years of Sejarah in secondary school. If you think Sarawak is bad, see how Sabah is portrayed in the Sejarah books. Centuries of Sulu, Brunei and North Borneo Company history reduced to just 20 pages.

Posted on: 2007/6/12 13:51
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Re: Retracing History of Kuching
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Yep, as evyone is beginning to notice, history cannot be learnt if u juz read stories from one side of the viewpoint, especially mainstream "canonized" views, sadly many a times these viewpoints are from governing office, and are shaped up for government propaganda or serve other purposes to divert readers from certain 'unwanted' truths.

Our state's history, as Mocha and folks here properly addressed, is biased if juz view from West M's angle.

Following: A brief history mentioned in Wiki about our beloved Kuching:

"Sarawak was a part of the Sultanate of Brunei 200 years ago but as a reward for its help in putting down a rebellion, it was ceded to a British adventurer called James Brooke who ruled it as his personal kingdom. Kuching was made his capital and headquarters. The Brooke family ruled Sarawak until the Japanese occupation in December 1941. Kuching surrendered to the Japanese forces on 24 December 1941, and Sarawak was part of the Japanese Imperial Empire for three years and eight months, until the official Japanese surrender on 11 September 1945 on board HMAS Kapunda at Kuching. From March 1942 the Japanese operated a POW and civilian internee camp at Batu Lintang, three miles outside Kuching.[3] After the end of World War II the third and last Rajah, Sir Charles Vyner Brooke ceded Sarawak to the British Crown in 1946. Sarawak and the British Commonwealth fought an "Undeclared War" with Indonesia to keep Sarawak from being absorbed into Sukarno's Indonesia. The British gave Sarawak independence in 1963 and together with North Borneo (Sabah) and Singapore, helped form Malaysia. (Singapore became independent soon after)."

Posted on: 2007/6/12 14:09
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Re: Retracing History of Kuching
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West M'sian historians may not have adequately and accurately presented the colourful history of Sarawak in their publications, be it for educational purposes or otherwise, but at least they have not made significant alterations to distort actual facts and events. It is thus, the resposibility of Sarawakians to preserve and record their own history as it was, without bias, fear or prejudice, and to ensure that future generations can be truly proud of their past.

And Webbie, you have the honor to take the lead role in this regard!

Posted on: 2007/6/13 0:33

Edited by reid on 2007/6/13 0:52:58
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Re: Retracing History of Kuching
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before sarawak handled to Brooke ..sarawak is Kuching..Kuching is Sarawak..brunei kingdom is all over sarawak and Sarawak(kuching division,but that time only known as Sarawak) handed to James Brooke.Only after several years,part by part of other division took over by James Brooke.

so on that time,there is no Kuching name..only Sarawak.thats why the river stretch over Kuching City called as Sungai Sarawak and not sungai Kuching.Even the kampung nearby to satok was known as kampung Sarawak( you can found about this in sarawak Museum)

Sarawak name came from word cerava.the metal found by miner at several part of "Kuching" ...or Sarawak

so when is exact time this sarawak division or sarawak town.. named as KUching

emmm...

and from what word actually this Kuching word come from,buah mata Kuching or The cat itself but in local malay Kuching is Pusak,in iban is mayao.. maybe from bidayuh word..Kusheng..


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Posted on: 2007/6/13 3:27

Edited by webmaster on 2007/6/13 6:32:18
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Re: Retracing History of Kuching
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The Sejarah or History Book recorded as if Sarawak History began in 1963. The Brooke era is underplayed with only few pages of brief story. If you look around Kuching, the contribution of Brooke cannot be ignored. There are old court house, post office, Astana, Fort Magherita to name a fews. However history of this buildings are not well documented.

I found out that there are more Sarawak history documented outside Sarawak. Try to do a google search, you will find thousand of websites oversea but none in Sarawak.

The story of Liu San Pan attacking Astana and revenge of Rajah James Brooke attacking Bau might only be recorded in local Chinese history. Thousands of Chinese, young and old, male and female are burnt alive inside the Wing cave. The smell of the decomposed body of the Chinese mine workers was why the town is named Bau.

I am studying History of Brooke through a few books written by Bob Reece. To my astonishment, I began to understand why Sarawak is so much different from the rest of Malaysia.

The Brooke ruled Sarawak in a hope to preserve the native right, so that they are allowed to practise shifting cultivation without exploitation by foreign investor. The Brooke opposed foreign enterprise from developing big plantation in the fear that the native might be exploited and driven out of their land. The NCR land is recognition of native land ownership. This is different from the rest of Malaya and Sabah where the British encouraging foreign companies to set up big plantations.

This system of policy is still very much inheritaged nowasday. For example, West Malaysians and Sabahan had to apply for work permit to work in Malaysia and the situation is even worst for expatriot. For my personal opinion, Sarawakian shall be open to foreigners and other Malaysians to work as well as investment. Skills and investment is desired in development. Sarawakian shall not avoid competition from others as competition bring along skill, quality, improvement and development. I can't imagine in a globalised world, this system is still practised here. We have to open up for new opportunity.

Posted on: 2007/6/13 15:08
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Re: Retracing History of Kuching
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I agree, Sarawak needs to open up more opportunity for foreigners to come in. We lack the skills and population. True, we'll be needing 20 000 engineers in the next 5 years but how many Sarawakians can possibly fill in this shortfall?

The Brookes had in their mind a vision to 'civilise the natives', filled with Victorian idealism for a better world. They encouraged the natives to fend for themselves while shielding them from outward competition.

However, true, too much protection may make us less able to fend for ourselves, as we become to reliant on aid, as well as complacent, assured that the government will always come to our aid. If Sarawak were to advance further, we need to open up, and we need to be able to stand our ground.

The legal system in Sarawak is distinct from Malaysia as a whole. Seperate jurisdictions, like in Canada and Australia, but we have one very large difference. Only Sarawakians can practice in Sarawak. West Malaysians and Sabahans aren't allowed to practice law, if memory serves me right. In fact, if a Sarawakian is able to practice in Sydney or London, he can practice in Kuching, unlike in KL, where you still need to sit for your CLP, even though you're admitted to the NSW or Inns Bar.

Despite that, we must also keep in mind what happens to countries with open and liberal policies towards foreign workers. The Emirates enjoy amongst the highest percapita income as well as more skilled labour, blue or white collar, yet the local unemployment rate is dangerously high.

Compared with New Zealand, Australia or Hong Kong, the population is generally skilled, unemployment rates are low yet they still need foreign workers to fill in the gaps.

Keep in mind, opening up chances for foreign workers may not always bode well with the populace. Importing foreign workers may be seen as foreign workers snapping away the local's employment opportunities. That was the lead up to Germany's involvement in WWI and WWII, as well as the general hostility towards Asians and East Europeans in some Western countries.

Posted on: 2007/6/13 16:19
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Re: Retracing History of Kuching
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Quote:

mochaholic wrote:
I agree, Sarawak needs to open up more opportunity for foreigners to come in. We lack the skills and population. True, we'll be needing 20 000 engineers in the next 5 years but how many Sarawakians can possibly fill in this shortfall?

The Brookes had in their mind a vision to 'civilise the natives', filled with Victorian idealism for a better world. They encouraged the natives to fend for themselves while shielding them from outward competition.

However, true, too much protection may make us less able to fend for ourselves, as we become to reliant on aid, as well as complacent, assured that the government will always come to our aid. If Sarawak were to advance further, we need to open up, and we need to be able to stand our ground.

The legal system in Sarawak is distinct from Malaysia as a whole. Seperate jurisdictions, like in Canada and Australia, but we have one very large difference. Only Sarawakians can practice in Sarawak. West Malaysians and Sabahans aren't allowed to practice law, if memory serves me right. In fact, if a Sarawakian is able to practice in Sydney or London, he can practice in Kuching, unlike in KL, where you still need to sit for your CLP, even though you're admitted to the NSW or Inns Bar.

Despite that, we must also keep in mind what happens to countries with open and liberal policies towards foreign workers. The Emirates enjoy amongst the highest percapita income as well as more skilled labour, blue or white collar, yet the local unemployment rate is dangerously high.

Compared with New Zealand, Australia or Hong Kong, the population is generally skilled, unemployment rates are low yet they still need foreign workers to fill in the gaps.

Keep in mind, opening up chances for foreign workers may not always bode well with the populace. Importing foreign workers may be seen as foreign workers snapping away the local's employment opportunities. That was the lead up to Germany's involvement in WWI and WWII, as well as the general hostility towards Asians and East Europeans in some Western countries.

Well d legislation and channel for quality foreign immigrants once again suffers setback today due to d Mr-and-Mrs-Aussie-seeking-DAP news today...

Quality immigration calls for a much more foul-proof, complete, efficient and established planning, work flow, legislative system in a whole than what our current shabby Jabatan Immigresen has, or able, to offer...

Sigh... where's d quality control in gov...

wait... aren't we a lilbit off-topic?

Posted on: 2007/6/13 16:52
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Re: Retracing History of Kuching
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Quote:

Simpson wrote:
The Sejarah or History Book recorded as if Sarawak History began in 1963. The Brooke era is underplayed with only few pages of brief story. If you look around Kuching, the contribution of Brooke cannot be ignored. There are old court house, post office, Astana, Fort Magherita to name a fews. However history of this buildings are not well documented.

I found out that there are more Sarawak history documented outside Sarawak. Try to do a google search, you will find thousand of websites oversea but none in Sarawak.

The story of Liu San Pan attacking Astana and revenge of Rajah James Brooke attacking Bau might only be recorded in local Chinese history. Thousands of Chinese, young and old, male and female are burnt alive inside the Wing cave. The smell of the decomposed body of the Chinese mine workers was why the town is named Bau.

I am studying History of Brooke through a few books written by Bob Reece. To my astonishment, I began to understand why Sarawak is so much different from the rest of Malaysia.

The Brooke ruled Sarawak in a hope to preserve the native right, so that they are allowed to practise shifting cultivation without exploitation by foreign investor. The Brooke opposed foreign enterprise from developing big plantation in the fear that the native might be exploited and driven out of their land. The NCR land is recognition of native land ownership. This is different from the rest of Malaya and Sabah where the British encouraging foreign companies to set up big plantations.

This system of policy is still very much inheritaged nowasday. For example, West Malaysians and Sabahan had to apply for work permit to work in Malaysia and the situation is even worst for expatriot. For my personal opinion, Sarawakian shall be open to foreigners and other Malaysians to work as well as investment. Skills and investment is desired in development. Sarawakian shall not avoid competition from others as competition bring along skill, quality, improvement and development. I can't imagine in a globalised world, this system is still practised here. We have to open up for new opportunity.


aha i agreed with that and just want to add some missing link etc etc..
i think most of us here considered the third generation 3g ..or the third generation after independence of Sarawak through malaysia.Before Malaysia sarawak is one country like Brunei,Samoa,fiji etc etc..the 3G genneration already lived in harmonius malaysia and doesnt realised that if were not in malaysia,we re maybe still another foreign country or maybe we're in indonesia now.Based from old sarawak flag.blue,white and red..the influence is pure indonesian.i think maybe on that time local people in sarawak still attract to the concept of Indonesia Raya by Soekarno.even the confrontation in malaysia provoked by sokaerno and supported by philipin as neo imperialism of British through the establishment of one country name malaysia

the history of sarawak of courselah start earlier than 1963 and earlier than james brooke come to sarawak,you guy should go to sarawak Pustaka at petrajaya and read book at Sarawakiana.there is so many books from local and western writers wrote about sarawak,i think the books there we cant found in bookstore nowadays.it too long to put in written here,but there is so many interesting facts i/we dont know about sarawak.

the kingdom of Brunei,sarawak and Sambas was connected,and so many natives /dayak tribe on that time.beside malay,iban,bidayuh.but political power can make and change our certain knowledge and some perspective of history to us and make asking to ourself..what really happened yesterday??

if you go to kampung santubong,there is one lot of land belong to sarawak Museum,that area still fenced with barb wire.a few decade ago,some people found gold and other jewellery there and after some research, founded that the items was belongs to traders in santubong during 400 years plus ago..so santubong is advanced on that time as port of trader..weither Sarawak(Kuching) on that time maybe start earlier from Santubong .

grave of sultan tengah which is the first and last sultan of sarawak dated more than 100 years before Brooke come to Sarawak. he got murdered by local rebel fighter
maybe icontinue about that later lahh..

i have many west malaysian staying here in sarawak but the immigration procedure and labour law etc make them ask me..is sarawak still not in malaysia..whi it so hard to stay long enuff and working here..
as what i remember through history,b4 the independence of malaysia,sararswak leader on that time give some condition if want to sarawak join malaysia,part of cone controlled and they cannot woditions is,amount of west malaysian or sabahan came to sarawak must be controlled and they cannot working in professional job in sarawak like doctor,lawyer ,engineer etc etc(except 4 gov)..until the day the sarawakian have same level of achievement with west malaysian counterpart and maybe on that time sarawak door will opened to west malaysians and sabahn to work here..

Posted on: 2007/6/13 17:30
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